I've always imagined this hard brick stuff is a result of a high peat content, which if allowed to go bone dry becomes more & more difficult to re-wet. Which would you choose? This is not guaranteed to work, but the plant has a better chance of survival if you do. That way, as the water evaporates it will raise the humidity level immediately around your plant. Water lightly, just enough to settle the soil, and put it in a warm bright spot and leave it alone for about a week, then water as usual. This is the result of (primarily) iron and magnesium-containing molecules bonding to soil particulate surfaces after exposure to O2 and H2O, making it more difficult for the water molecules to be adsorbed to particle surfaces and to be absorbed into the organic particle (peat and bark) proper. This novice gal needs to step things up! Drafts aren't bad unless they're sudden & cold. Botani name: Ficus triangularis variegata Pot size: 17cm pot Total height: about 80-90cm Location: light to partial shade - all year round in the room - not below 15 ° C Care: keep moist regularly but avoid waterlogging Not all of us can adopt this method because it is time consuming, but if you have only a few plants (or don't mind doting on the ones you have), ;o) you might consider:Slowly & evenly apply water to the soil surface until the soil is almost saturated, but no water appears yet at the drain hole (after a time or two, you'll learn approximately how much water you should use to achieve this initial level of saturation). Its also called F.triangularis, that’s because the plant’s leaves are triangular. The soil: Fertile, loose: 1 part of sod land, 1 part of leaf land, 1/2 part of sand, you can add a little charcoal. Ficus Triangularis Variegata plants get their name from their unusual triangular leaves. It sounds like perhaps you've been following the soil discussion thread, by your familiarity with some of the ingredients I use regularly? Should I do this to clean the roots for the new one? This allows the offending molecules to go into suspension & makes the soil easily wettable, so the soil is thoroughly wetted on the second watering and offending accumulating metal salts are flushed from soils. Generally, soils with high organic content exhibit hydrophobic tendencies (they get difficult to rewet and repel water) when their moisture content drops below about 30%. Commonly grown in containers indoors or on patios, the Ficus triangularis grows to only 8 feet tall … A nook is an alcove, a cranny is a crack or crevice. I recently purchased a variegated Ficus Triangularis. Sr Item name 1 Ficus Triangularis variegata … However, I cannot find any mention of the fruit problem on Google.What gives ?Any information is greatly appreciated as I would like to begin using it again.ThanksR.Benn. Ficus triangular is a fairly shade-tolerant plant. I love her so much, but she has caused me endless frustration! Ficus roots do not like to be water logged and will rot if the soil remains too wet. So, this addresses only the tendency of primarily the organic component of soils to become reluctant to absorb water after reaching a certain level of dryness. However, she has COMPLETELY (old leaves included) reverted to green. I've got it next to my Calatheas so it gets a bit of extra humidity from the humidifier, though not much since it sits pretty far from it. Any advice? If a Ficus Triangularis gets yellow leaves it needs more water. I think the main problem was the soil. Variegated plants need more light than their green counterparts to ward of stress/strain due to low light levels, but they are also unable to tolerate light conditions as bright as their green cousins. If you move the plant to a sunny location and the variegation doesn't return, the plant has likely reverted. Compaction is an entirely different thing, though it can, and often does join hands with hydrophobic soils to make our lives miserable. A lot of good advise above, but the question arises, is the first plant sitll alive? Also, a common name is “Variegated Dwarf Triangle Fig” This cultivar has a creamy yellow leaf with irregular gray-green areas in the center. I bare-root and repot 150-200 plants each year. I have been discouraged from using it in the present because of the messy figs that appear on this plant at a certain time of the year. No pests as far as I can tell. We can get rid of mealy bugs by examining the plant with our eyes and plucking them with our hands, you could … Ficus Triangularis Variegata....help!? Ficus triangularis variegata Triangle Fig, One of the easiest indoor Figs. The F. triangularis with which I'm familiar is not the same species I've seen as F. natalensis. One, has full sun all day, but can be drafty. {{gwi:54307}}Brick hard soil is either due to calcification of old organic matter in root balls of plants that have not been root-pruned and properly repotted, or compaction of fine ingredients in an inappropriate soil. The first consideration is what presents the least risk to the plant. Water: Water a Triangle Ficus when the top 50% of the potting soil is dry. Thank you all for great advice. I often find this brick mix situation w/ Hoyas purchased in box stores. Bright diffused light. (The best Ficus fertilizer is a liquid one at ½ strength). This is a good illustration of why soils comprised of a mix of larger particles of mineral and organic materials that resist breakdown will hold up longer & resist the problems of compaction and difficulty in rewetting that are so common in bagged soils. I should also mention that there are certain microorganisms that also can affect wettability, but they usually show up on the very top surface as a noticeable crust. It’s not unusual for plants to drop upwards of 20% of their foliage when trying to adjust to changing conditions brought on by abiotic or biotic stressors. This is especially true for smaller ficus trees like rubber trees and … Full sun is best, but if the draft is chilly - if the (draft) temperature there registers below 50*, it will present problems for the plant. Now, she is a stick plant. Soils are the same. This easy-care beauty shows off quantities of green and cream, triangle-heart-shape leaves that are held aloft on stiff compact stems. She’s dropping leaves but that’s to be expected from a ficus during the acclimation period. Either 1 part of the turf ground, 1 part peat, 1 part leaf earth, 1 part sand (pH 6.0-6.5). Ficus triangularis, commonly known as triangle ficus, is one of the least fussy in the genus. Moving a ficus multiple times in a short period could put the plant into severe enough … ), Here is a link that might be useful: GRIN taxonomy, I have used this plant with interior plantscapes in the past. Purchased item: Variegated Ficus Triangularis. There isn't necessarily a correlation between soils that are high in peat content (actually, high in organic content is prolly more accurate) and this rock-hard condition being discussed, though. They shoot a high pressure, but low volume stream of water that's easy to direct into root nooks & crannies, blasting stubborn soil loose w/o damaging roots. I have been doing a lot of research, but am finding contradicting information. Scale(?) This rarity from Africa is a rarity: it has triangular leaves !!! Mutations that originated in a specific layer of meristematic cells have the greatest chance of remaining stable for years to come, but if the mutation originated outside of this layer, the chances of that mutation remaining stable are far slimmer. Water again, so that approximately 10-15% of the total amount of water applied in both waterings exits the drain hole. I've got it next … Now is a poor time to repot Ficus - especially in more northern climes; but, if there is a chance you'll lose the plant because of the soil, you definitely should repot. I grow all Ficus in an equal mix of Turface, granite grit, and pine or fir bark, with a little lime thrown in the mix. Close. Or, do I just resolve myself to the fact that she shall be green from now on? Can you spell out exactly what I should purchase and mix together? Triangle ficus is suitable as a houseplant, though, tolerating an indoor environment quite well. Ficus trees are a popular houseplant that can be found in many homes, but the attractive and easy to care for ficus trees still have a frustrating habit of dropping leaves, seemingly without reason. Wait 5-10 minutes for accumulated salts to dissolve into the water you just applied. I think it needs to be repotted. My variegated ficus triangularis keeps dropping leaves! I have seen many suggestions for more light, and many suggestions for less light. It was sitting in a NW facing window where my other ficus plants are doing well, but after it wouldn't stop dropping leaves I moved it to a room with big SE facing windows. ... it was overwatered at the grocery store and browning and dropping leaves like crazy. All the the small branches and buds dried up. Unless you have realized that the light levels are far too low and are moving the plant to a sunnier position, it is going to react by dropping even more leaves. I love this particular plant, so I purchased another one. I am afraid it is going to be a challenge to get all the peat (I think) off of it, otherwise. Well...almost. This classy little ficus is sometimes called F. triangularis, because the leaves are triangular in shape. Ficus Triangularis variegata – Plant ₹ 592.00 Ficus trees are a common plant in the home and office, mainly due to the fact that they look like a typical tree with a single trunk and a spreading canopy. Compaction is caused by a breakdown in soil particle size, or by using inappropriate ingredients in soil. For Ficus, I make my own mix, simpler than those above; but either of Houseplant mix + 1/3 pumice or C&S mix w/ 1/3 perlite w/ bit of charcoal chips (sometimes), something like that, fast draining & crumbly, when dry (I just checked my varieg. Ficus tree’s only drawback is that, given a sudden change in temperature, humidity or wind speed, your lovely weeping fig might play dead and drop all its leaves. No peat? The plant must be shaded from direct sunlight. This bright variegation really stands out. Eventually, it will compact to about half it's original volume. As far as siting the plant. The other plant is in fact dead. Sand, peat, garden soil, compost, will all eventually compact in containers and rob soils of aeration. Reminds me of F. salicifolia and nerifolia (willow-leaf/narrow leaf fig, etc. When it compacts and reduces its volume by half, it must push half the air it once held from the box. The lower leaves and branches bring essential nutrients to the trunk, and a strong trunk is essential for holding up the ficus's foliage. I was gifted this Ficus triangularis variegata that has some crispy edges and the leaves are falling off like crazy! The plant pictured is the exact plant being auctioned. She produced a few new buds, but little by little, the stems have dried up and died. This plant NEEDS light, if you do not give it enough light it will drop it’s leaves or it will not produce any variegation in it’s growth. It's a super tough plant that can take a bit more abuse than other members of the ficus … To see how to help compensate for this physical condition - from another thread: There IS a way to water that is is most effective - that allows you to maintain a favorable level of nutrients, while still allowing you to flush accumulating salts from fertilizers and irrigation water from the soil. ", we will help you diagnose and treat it! Close. I had sat it near a dehumidifier for a couple of days to help it dry out more quickly. These plants are very easy to take care of and Ficus Triangularis Variegata propagation is not very difficult … Ficus triangularis 'Variegata' also thrives in humid conditions so if your house has dry air you might consider placing your plant on a pebble filled tray with water. Is there anyhting I can do to encourage the white? Ficus triangularis variegata belongs to Moraceae Family and its country of origin is said to be South Africa. As the organic particles become smaller, watering from above has the same effect as if you were to take a fluffy box of popped corn and vibrate it. This African Alright, so it has been quite a few months since I got my second Ficus Triangularis Variegata. This popular houseplant is sensitive to changes. If you wish, contact me off forum - I have a suggestion I'd like to make. Pretty soon she dropped every single leaf. I see that many people seem to swear by them - and I agree that they are attractive. She was packed well, roots were protected. Soak the soil until water comes out of the drip holes in the bottom of the container. This classy rare ficus is sometimes called F. triangularis, because the leaves are triangular in shape. Peat seems to absorb warm water better than cold or room temp water, then take the hose and spray off all the peat from the roots. I still have strong hopes that I can turn this crazy plant around. I've included a picture of when I got it over 2 weeks ago. FWIW: Ficus triangularis - aka natalensis (natal fig). After doing a lot of research, I thought I was doing everything right (watering, light, drafts, etc.). ;o). another one of its names that are commonly used is “Variegated Ficus Triangularis”. Water thoroughly and then let the plant dry out again before it gets another drink. (it won't soak in or stick to the peat and bark) Once sufficient wetting has occurred to allow the metal molecules to go back into solution, the particles become more easily wettable again. Moraceae. This flushes a large % of accumulated salts from the container." Variations in watering, light exposure, and temperature, as well as pest and disease problems are the most common stressors triggering leaves to drop from ficus. 1. Increasing light (to a point) can reverse the trend. GENERAL INFORMATION. Jeanette Sep 30 ... Ficus triangularis variegata Rooted TidzBitz $ 21.00. Allow the soil to dry out the same amount before watering again. I currently have this hard brick situation w/ a gardenia that's still going. It is looking a bit droopy, probably from the move. This bright variegation really … Varying degrees of defoliation would be likely, and extended compromise of the plant's ability to carry on efficient photosynthesis should be expected. She did not drop all of her leaves like the first plant did, and she has produced about 6 new leaves. If the plant begins dropping leaves, water less often. I am a novice/intermediate indoor gardener. Do not let the plant dry out completey any more. I took all the wonderful advice, and the new plant is doing very well. Also, I have two spots in my house where the little darling will go. The good news is you can usually correct the problems so the leaves grow back and return to bright green. I purchased the plant from the same person (it was beautiful and healthy [looking] at first), so I am assuming the soil will be the same (I should be receiving it any day). If you're wondering "what's wrong with my plant? It may loose some leaves from shock, but it will have a better chance of survival without the brick. The soil is crusty and doesn't seem good anymore. Excellent tools for removing stubborn soil, are the 'Dramm Fogg-it' hose nozzles. After doing a lot of research, I thought I was doing everything right (watering, light, drafts, etc.). It was sitting in a NW facing window where my other ficus plants are doing well, but after it wouldn't stop dropping leaves I moved it to a room with big SE facing windows. Also, a common name is “Variegated Dwarf Triangle Fig” This cultivar has a creamy yellow leaf with irregular gray-green areas in the center. Allow the soil to dry before watering again. Help finding the right light in my apartment for plants! So here is where I need help, as I want to do right by this new plant. As the water flows around the smaller & smaller particles, it causes them to nest tightly against one another & become tightly interwoven (compacted), which causes the hardness being discussed. Then repot in one of the soil mixes above or any other peat-less soil. I JUST posted this on another thread, but it really applies here as well, & is along the same lines as what Karen was saying about soils allowed to go very dry being difficult to rewet (hydrophobic). Ficus Triangularis Variegata | Variegated Dwarf Triangle Family. Does anyone know the difference between a nook & a cranny w/o looking it up? The leaves seem to lighten to a lime green colour before they drop. Soak the soil slowly until water runs from the bottom of the plant's pot. Under healthy growing conditions, the leaves should grow back in a few weeks. on stem of Pep polybotrya cutting (received today via mail), Cymbidium orchid - black spots on the leaves. I recently purchased a variegated Ficus Triangularis. 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